Elizabeth Red Fern Greer Black Hawk: Who Was This Woman?

 




Doing genealogy is hard enough without having to wade through the myths propagated on the internet. This is made clear when trying to prove/disprove Native American ancestry. There seems to be an unwritten rule that all women whose birth names are unknown must be Cherokee or from some other Native American tribe. Here is an interesting case of the same mythical women being claimed by multiple families. 

Elizabeth Red Fern Blackhawk:

#1: This Elizabeth was found on in the comments of the Wikitree profile for Elizabeth

When Elizabeth Greer Naktika Redfern was born in 1723, in Gunpowder, Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America, her father, Chief Thunder Black Hawk, was 23 and her mother, Abbee Redfern, was 13. She married Jacob Davis on 6 February 1745, in Saint Johns Parish, Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America. They were the parents of at least 6 sons and 3 daughters. She died in 1781, in Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States, at the age of 58, and was buried in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. TREE no source] There is an Elizabeth Greer who married Jacob Davice-6 in St. John's Parish. 

There was a woman named Elizabeth Greer who married Jacob Davis, that's about all that is documented fact in the this statement. 

#2 Elizbeth Red Fern Blackhawk:

There is a family tradition that Johann Wendell Mueller or Miller had a common-law marriage with Red Fawn (Fern) Na Me Qua Tikodiddie Hawk Blackhawk, supposed daughter of either a Cherokee or SAC [?] Chief by the name of Thunder Black Hawk and Abee Red Fern. The tradition goes on to claim that Red Fawn and Mueller had children together and that she died of smallpox along with an infant grandson and that they are buried together.

Same name, same parents. Different husbands. 

What do these two profiles have in common? No documented proof. There is no known Cherokee Chief known as Chief Thunder Black Hawk, his wife is equally unknown. There were no Cherokee or other tribe living near Baltimore in 1730. How do you explain the surname Greer? 

Who was Chief Thunder Black Hawk? No one seems to be able to agree on this either. Neither the tribe nor place of birth are known. With this many red flags I find the Red Fern hard to believe. 

Comments

  1. I believe I have a accurate record of my family tree back to Elizabeth Red Fern.
    Trent Canupp(me)
    Chester Canupp
    Cleo Canupp
    Martha Ann Peeler
    Mary Emeline Peeler
    DeWalt Theobald Miller
    John Jacob Miller
    Elizabeth Red Fern

    Trent Canupp

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  2. Hello, I have a family record and Bible record of Nataki Redfern / Elizabeth Davis who’s father was a chief named Blackhawk and in our records there is no miller name or family line for her and her grave is next to her husband Samual Davis in Virginia. Samual Davis was in the military and a translator. I keep reading similar stories of our ancestor but we have no record of the miller line existing in our family records. I do though think there is a possibility that they were related and could have been another sibling that was not recognized. According to the verbal history Nataki was a part of a band of sauk indians that joined with Cherokee and that this is part of why her record is hard to find. I can’t verify that there were daddy issues between Nataki and her dad but it seems to be the case. Nataki was a weaver who was very knowledgeable about medicine and passed this knowledge on to her children. Nataki also we believe may have lost some recognition also for marrying a white man and not residing in Cherokee territory during the time of the rolls. The Cherokee recognizes that not all cherokee’s were on the rolls but if you aren’t on the rolls you unfortunately will not be recognized no matter what evidence you have to support otherwise. Im hopeful though that one day the Cherokee Nation will recognize DNA evidence because I have this and that is something you can’t fake. I’m very glad and thankful to all of those who are posting their family records such as this.

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